Posts tagged Sinusitis

Alkalol Nasal Wash Blog: The 2012 Asthma Capital rankings were released today, a good time to remind everyone that effective treatment of seasonal allergies and chronic sinusitis can help control asthma symptoms and reduce the number of asthma attacks. 

Alkalol Nasal Wash Blog: The 2012 Asthma Capital rankings were released today, a good time to remind everyone that effective treatment of seasonal allergies and chronic sinusitis can help control asthma symptoms and reduce the number of asthma attacks. 

Natural Cold And Flu Fighting Tips That Really Work (courtesy of Shine from Yahoo!)
Neti Pot
Think of a neti pot as a genie’s lamp that performs sinus-clearing magic. Fill it with warm saltwater (use noniodized salt). Then stand over a sink, tilt your head to one side, and slowly pour the liquid through one nostril and allow it to stream out the other - along with a lot of gunk.

Hot Tea with Honey
Drink plenty of liquids to stay hydrated, and make sure they’re hot. Black tea helps soothe a sore throat and chase away the chills with a good dose of virus-fighting interferon. Add a dollop of antioxidant-rich honey and a squeeze of lemon for vitamin C.
Orange Juice
Crave OJ when you’re sick? It’s full of vitamin C, which may shorten a cold’s duration of and work as a natural decongestant. Aim for 500 mg of vitamin C four times a day. A cup of orange juice has 124 mg. Other good sources: strawberries, tomatoes, and broccoli.
Hot Peppers
Hot peppers contain capsaicin, the compound that gives chiles their kick and acts as a decongestant to help relieve a stuffy nose. Can’t stand the heat? Mild bell peppers can help, too. They don’t have capsaicin, but they’re full of virus-fighting vitamin C.
Chicken Soup
Grandma was right — a bowl of chicken soup does make you feel better when you’re sick. This time-tested remedy contains cysteine, an amino acid that’s chemically similar to a bronchitis drug to help reduce inflammation. The salty broth also helps thin mucus, and the protein in the chicken helps you produce disease-fighting antibodies
Garlic and Ginger
Both can offer potent cold and flu relief. Garlic helps bolster your immune system to squelch an infection, while ginger helps tame nausea. Add a little ginger and garlic to your chicken soup to boost its cold- and flu-fighting power.
Steam
There’s a reason why you feel better after taking a hot shower or sit over a bowl of steaming water with a towel over your head. The steam shrinks the mucus membranes in your nose and throat, and encourages mucus to drain, which eases congestion.
Oatmeal
Whole grains, like oatmeal, contain selenium, zinc, and beta glucan to help support your immune system and fend off infection. Add a generous dollop of yogurt - its probiotics may help keep a virus from settling into your respiratory system.

Natural Cold And Flu Fighting Tips That Really Work (courtesy of Shine from Yahoo!)

Neti Pot

Think of a neti pot as a genie’s lamp that performs sinus-clearing magic. Fill it with warm saltwater (use noniodized salt). Then stand over a sink, tilt your head to one side, and slowly pour the liquid through one nostril and allow it to stream out the other - along with a lot of gunk.

Hot Tea with Honey

Drink plenty of liquids to stay hydrated, and make sure they’re hot. Black tea helps soothe a sore throat and chase away the chills with a good dose of virus-fighting interferon. Add a dollop of antioxidant-rich honey and a squeeze of lemon for vitamin C.

Orange Juice

Crave OJ when you’re sick? It’s full of vitamin C, which may shorten a cold’s duration of and work as a natural decongestant. Aim for 500 mg of vitamin C four times a day. A cup of orange juice has 124 mg. Other good sources: strawberries, tomatoes, and broccoli.

Hot Peppers

Hot peppers contain capsaicin, the compound that gives chiles their kick and acts as a decongestant to help relieve a stuffy nose. Can’t stand the heat? Mild bell peppers can help, too. They don’t have capsaicin, but they’re full of virus-fighting vitamin C.

Chicken Soup

Grandma was right — a bowl of chicken soup does make you feel better when you’re sick. This time-tested remedy contains cysteine, an amino acid that’s chemically similar to a bronchitis drug to help reduce inflammation. The salty broth also helps thin mucus, and the protein in the chicken helps you produce disease-fighting antibodies

Garlic and Ginger

Both can offer potent cold and flu relief. Garlic helps bolster your immune system to squelch an infection, while ginger helps tame nausea. Add a little ginger and garlic to your chicken soup to boost its cold- and flu-fighting power.

Steam

There’s a reason why you feel better after taking a hot shower or sit over a bowl of steaming water with a towel over your head. The steam shrinks the mucus membranes in your nose and throat, and encourages mucus to drain, which eases congestion.

Oatmeal

Whole grains, like oatmeal, contain selenium, zinc, and beta glucan to help support your immune system and fend off infection. Add a generous dollop of yogurt - its probiotics may help keep a virus from settling into your respiratory system.

Can exercise, cauliflower, and nasal rinsing keep colds away?

These natural foods and time-tested remedies could help you keep colds and flu at bay this season.

Top Five Herbs For Cold and Flu Season

Interesting blog post we came across with a list of cold and flu fighting herbs and essential oils. Thyme, a key Alkalol ingredient, makes the list. Enjoy!

Avoiding & Treating Nasal Decongestant Spray Addiction

The official name is Rhinitis Medicamentosa.

But many simply refer to it as Nasal Decongestant Spray Addiction — The more you use an over-the-counter decongestant spray, the more you risk becoming dependent on the spray for temporary nasal congestion relief that will, in fact, only get worse.

It’s a vicious cycle that can lead to patients spraying their nose every few hours.

How do you break this habit? 

Fauquier ENT in Warrenton, VA provides its patients with the following advice:

"Just like with any addiction, there is going to be a withdrawal process. The withdrawal for nasal decongestant spray addiction is severe nasal congestion and obstruction lasting several weeks to months. These withdrawal symptoms are unavoidable.

However, there are a few medications that can help blunt the severity, though withdrawal will still be experienced. As such, treatment we prescribe patients are as follows:

1. Stop the nasal decongestant spray use immediately

2. High dose prednisone starting at 60mg tapered slowly over ~3 weeks

3. Start steroid nasal spray use

4. Start hypertonic saline flushes to the nose (Alkalol is hypertonic)

Usually by four weeks, the withdrawal symptom start to improve and once completely resolved, your nose will be back to its normal healthy state!”

Have questions about Alkalol or sinus health? Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or send an email to info@alkalolcompany.com.

Have a healthy week!

Pharmacist Sherry Torkos discusses why nasal washing is a healthy option for people looking for natural alternatives to traditional OTC nasal decongestants and cold, flu, and allergy medications.

Two Simple Cold & Flu Season Tips

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention says that most colds and flu are caught by placing infected hands to the eyes or nose or in your mouth. You can infect others a day before your symptoms appear. Incubation period is usually three days, but can range anywhere from one to four days. 

What are your best weapons for cold and flu defense? 

1. Washing your hands! 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this is the most important thing you can do to keep from getting sick. By washing your hands frequently, you can clean away germs that have been picked up from various sources.

When to wash your hands:

- Before you eat or touch food.
- After you use the bathroom.
- When you come in from working or playing outdoors.
- After you touch or play with an animal.
- After you cough, sneeze or blow your nose.

2. Don’t cover your sneezes and coughs with your hands! 

Because germs and viruses cling to your bare hands, muffling coughs and sneezes with your hands results in passing along your germs to others. When you feel a sneeze or cough coming, use a tissue then throw it away immediately. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into the inside of your elbow.  (This is may seem uncomfortable or even disgusting at first, but many schools and health professionals really do promote this!) 

Have a healthy week!

Fall Allergy Hot Spots

                                2011 Fall Allergy Capitals

The non-profit Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America recently released its 2011 Fall Allergy Capitals, an annual list of the top 100 worst metro areas for seasonal allergies.
Knoxville, TN tops this year’s list. Where does your city rank?
Find the Top-20 Fall Allergy Capitals here or click here for the full AAFA list. 

 
Ragweed season peaks in early October in many parts of the country. That’s bad news for the estimated 20 percent of Americans who are allergic to ragweed pollen. So we thought we’d share a few tips this week from KBTX-TV in College Station, TX that will help you ease symptoms until ragweed season ends with the first frost, usually in November.
1. Keep Windows Closed: Ragweed pollen is particularly light; it can travel up to 400 miles. So the pollen that’s riding the breeze into your home can make symptoms worse. The same is true when you’re driving - crank up the AC to help filter and dry the air.
2. Keep up on pollen counts: Find current pollen level readings in your area at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology’s National Allergy Bureau. Pollen levels peak in midday.
3. Shower before bedtime: Pollen can stick to your hair and skin. If you spent the day outside, shower before sleep so you don’t transfer the allergens to your pillow and bedsheets.
4. Flush pollen from your nose: The thought of pouring warm saltwater up one nostril to watch it flow out the other may not sound like fun, but neti pots really do work — they rinse your nasal cavity of allergens and help you breathe easier. Research shows they’re just as effective as some medications at relieving symptoms, minus the side effects.
For the full KBTX-TV ragweed story and a video interview with allergist Dr. Barry Paull, click here. 
For more information on Alkalol, connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or by email at info@alkalolcompany.com
Have a healthy week!
-James Whitters, The Alkalol Company

Ragweed season peaks in early October in many parts of the country. That’s bad news for the estimated 20 percent of Americans who are allergic to ragweed pollen. So we thought we’d share a few tips this week from KBTX-TV in College Station, TX that will help you ease symptoms until ragweed season ends with the first frost, usually in November.

1. Keep Windows Closed: Ragweed pollen is particularly light; it can travel up to 400 miles. So the pollen that’s riding the breeze into your home can make symptoms worse. The same is true when you’re driving - crank up the AC to help filter and dry the air.

2. Keep up on pollen counts: Find current pollen level readings in your area at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology’s National Allergy Bureau. Pollen levels peak in midday.

3. Shower before bedtime: Pollen can stick to your hair and skin. If you spent the day outside, shower before sleep so you don’t transfer the allergens to your pillow and bedsheets.

4. Flush pollen from your nose: The thought of pouring warm saltwater up one nostril to watch it flow out the other may not sound like fun, but neti pots really do work — they rinse your nasal cavity of allergens and help you breathe easier. Research shows they’re just as effective as some medications at relieving symptoms, minus the side effects.

For the full KBTX-TV ragweed story and a video interview with allergist Dr. Barry Paull, click here

For more information on Alkalol, connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or by email at info@alkalolcompany.com

Have a healthy week!

-James Whitters, The Alkalol Company


We are very pleased to announce that the full range of Alkalol Nasal Wash products are now available on Walgreens.com, where everyday free-shipping is available on orders of $25.00 or more.
Walgreens.com stocks all three Alkalol items: Our traditional Alkalol 16 oz bottle, our Alkalol Nasal Wash Cup, and our new Alkalol Nasal Wash kit that comes with both a 16 oz bottle of Alkalol and an Alkalol Nasal Wash Cup.
Please visit the new Alkalol page on Walgreens.com and see why it’s known as “America’s Healthiest Web Site!”

We are very pleased to announce that the full range of Alkalol Nasal Wash products are now available on Walgreens.com, where everyday free-shipping is available on orders of $25.00 or more.

Walgreens.com stocks all three Alkalol items: Our traditional Alkalol 16 oz bottle, our Alkalol Nasal Wash Cup, and our new Alkalol Nasal Wash kit that comes with both a 16 oz bottle of Alkalol and an Alkalol Nasal Wash Cup.

Please visit the new Alkalol page on Walgreens.com and see why it’s known as “America’s Healthiest Web Site!”